mrmattenlow:

marykatewiles:

neil-gaiman:

yulinisworking:

I Didn’t Write This | Ep. 8: Dark Sonnet by Neil Gaiman

I Didn’t Write This is a new literary adaptation series in which I adapt and direct excerpts of poetry and literature written by other people. New episodes once a month, usually. Subscribe, maybe? 

Directed by Yulin Kuang

Starring Whitney Milam

Voiceover by Mary Kate Wiles

Shot by Alyssa Brocato

This is great.

Oh, hey, Neil Gaiman.

:D

Well, look at that. First approval from Rainbow Rowell, now Neil Gaiman. I think this Yulin Kuang is going places. (C;

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

It’s the first day of school for most kids in the United States, and so a good time to highlight the resources the Digital Public Library of America has ready and waiting for students and teachers this school year.
Just like kids, DPLA spent the summer growing and maturing, adding new partners, new staff, and over a half-million items along the way. And we’ve been thinking a lot about how we can be most helpful in the classroom; this fall we will be talking to many educators from K-12 through college to get their advice.
Meanwhile, we encourage everyone to tell a teacher or student this week about some of DPLA’s handy features, some of which are sketched out in this post from DPLA Executive Director Dan Cohen. 
Image credit: Detail of “Catherine M. Rooney, 6th grade teacher instructs her alert pupils on the way and how of War Ration Book Two,” circa 1943. Courtesy the National Archives and Records Administration (view original record).

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

It’s the first day of school for most kids in the United States, and so a good time to highlight the resources the Digital Public Library of America has ready and waiting for students and teachers this school year.

Just like kids, DPLA spent the summer growing and maturing, adding new partners, new staff, and over a half-million items along the way. And we’ve been thinking a lot about how we can be most helpful in the classroom; this fall we will be talking to many educators from K-12 through college to get their advice.

Meanwhile, we encourage everyone to tell a teacher or student this week about some of DPLA’s handy features, some of which are sketched out in this post from DPLA Executive Director Dan Cohen

Image credit: Detail of “Catherine M. Rooney, 6th grade teacher instructs her alert pupils on the way and how of War Ration Book Two,” circa 1943. Courtesy the National Archives and Records Administration (view original record).

Monday, September 1, 2014
Anonymous:
Re: your "rule about naked people" -- How about people who take nude photos of themselves not be stupid and use storage devices that can be hacked, like cloud storage (or take any risks close to that)? Just HOW much personal responsibility does your generation need to shed before you get it through your thick skulls that it only costs $20 for a decent external hard drive these days? :|

fishingboatproceeds:

"The lock on your diary wasn’t very good, so it’s your fault I read your diary."

"The meaning of life is just to be alive. It is so plain and so obvious and so simple. And yet, everybody rushes around in a great panic as if it were necessary to achieve something beyond themselves."
Alan Watts (via thecalminside)
Sunday, August 31, 2014
classicladiesofcolor:


Anna May Wong's Certificate of Identity, August 18, 1924, National Archives at San Francisco.

She was born Wong Liu Tsong in 1905 in Los Angeles to a Cantonese-American family that had lived in America since at least 1855. However, being an American didn’t matter in a time when people of Chinese descent were being heavily legislated against. Beginning in 1909, any people of Chinese descent entering or residing in the US, regardless of the country of their birth, had to carry a Certificate of Identity with them at all times. Even at the peak of her fame, Wong still had to carry papers like the one above to prove she was allowed to be here. Read the rest of the article.

classicladiesofcolor:

Anna May Wong's Certificate of Identity, August 18, 1924, National Archives at San Francisco.

She was born Wong Liu Tsong in 1905 in Los Angeles to a Cantonese-American family that had lived in America since at least 1855. However, being an American didn’t matter in a time when people of Chinese descent were being heavily legislated against. Beginning in 1909, any people of Chinese descent entering or residing in the US, regardless of the country of their birth, had to carry a Certificate of Identity with them at all times. Even at the peak of her fame, Wong still had to carry papers like the one above to prove she was allowed to be here. Read the rest of the article.

I can’t sleep past 6:45 on a Sunday: An autobiography

Also a problem.

Friday, August 29, 2014

feathersihatefeathers replied to your post: “I went into a store to buy a pair of $8.80 pair of jeans and ended up buying $80.00 worth of jewelry with tiny animals on it: An autobiography.”:

ooohhh… A very important question: what animals?

The animal jewelry purchase consisted of: cat necklace, dog necklace, necklace w/ an owl on branch, necklace with birds on a wire, fox ring.

I went into a store to buy a pair of $8.80 pair of jeans and ended up buying $80.00 worth of jewelry with tiny animals on it: An autobiography.

 
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